'America's March to Yorktown' (AMtY)
Visit Alexandria and Mount Vernon, Virginia,
23-24 September 2006

The AMtY marchers in front of Virginia Historic Road Marker for the French camp in Alexandria, VA, in 1781 and 1782. They make camp, on the night of 23 September 2006, in the back yard of the near-by historic Lee-Fendall House.


Marchers seen above, walking down Washington Street in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia , early afternoon of 23 September 2006, are part of an initiative described at their own website: ‘America's March to Yorktown (AMtY) -- 2006'.


Marchers in front of Christ's Church, Old Town, Alexandria, Virginia.


Late lunch at Gadsby's Tavern, Alexandria, VA.


Paying respects at the grave and Memorial to the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution in the churchyard of The Old Presbyterian Meeting House, Alexandria, Virginia.


Morning of 24 September, marchers reach historic Mount Vernon, Virginia.
Technically, neither the allied wagon train nor the French cavalry visited Mount Vernon in September 1781. The significant historic, Yorktown Campaign event at Mount Vernon was the visit of the commanding allied generals, Washington and Rochambeau, on 10 and 11 September 1781. There was no 225th anniversary commemoration of that event.


Marchers at the Historic Road Marker describing Washington and Rochambeau's 1781 visit to Mount Vernon.


Marchers by the Washington-Rochambeau Route to Victory Display, which describes and marks the beginning of the route the allied commanders traveled together from Mount Vernon to Yorktown.


Marchers continue their trek south along the Mount Vernon Estate red brick wall. They continued west on Mt. Vernon memorial Pkwy to US Route 1, then head south to historic Pohick Church, where they turn east to the Junction of Old Colchester and Furnace roads. The historic French Army camp was in that vicinity, near the Occoquan River. The AMtY will camp a short distance away, at Pohick Bay Regional Park for the night of 24 September. See: AMtY Visit Colchester.


However, the day is not over!
See AMtY March Vist with Mount Vernon Neighborhood Friends,
evening of 24 September 2006.


The AMtY marchers consist of a small group that is retracing on foot, as much as possible, the historic movement of the French Army under comte de Rochambeau from Newport (RI) to join George Washington's American Army north of New York City. From there, the re enactment march retraces the overland portion of both the American and French armies in 1781 from positions near New York City to Yorktown, Virginia, as one of the essential parts of the 1781 Yorktown Campaign. Actually, after Anapolis, MD, the allied march overland comprised a wagon train and the French cavalry. The allied infantry regiments and artillery components were conveyed from Anapolis to the Yorktown area by boats. However, the entire French force did march back north in early 1782, using essentially the same campsites.
This ‘commemorative march' marks the 225th Anniversary of the historic one. It is part of a broader effort to support the establishment of a 600-mile ‘Washington - Rochambeau Revolutionary Route' [often abbreviated as ‘W3R'] as an US ‘Historic Trail – an initiative inaugurated on Dec. 16th, 2000 at Washington's Headquarters in Newburgh, NY. "This effort includes coordinating with Francophone commissions that unite French cultural groups with American veteran's organizations, historical groups, and other volunteers to provide a Nationally recognized Historical Trail that would outline a self-guided auto route, hiking trails, visitors centers, appropriate signage, and associated literature. The literature and signage will include original campsites, historical sites and other local points of interest along the route."

Further information on the commemoration of the 225th Anniversary of the Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route is at

Further historical background on this event can be viewed at the following webpages:

Return to webpage on ANNOUNCEMENTS of COMMEMORATIVE EVENTS.

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Page posted 24 September 2006, revised 29 September 2006.